ThingMagic RFID Readers Help Enhance Patient Experience at California Cancer Center PDF Print E-mail
February 24, 2010

Innovative RFID Solution Designed to Reduce Stress, Improve Facility Efficiencies

Cambridge, MA, February 24, 2010 – ThingMagic, Inc. (www.thingmagic.com), a leading developer of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, today announced its enterprise class Astra® RFID Readers have been deployed at the new Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center in Burbank, CA. The Astra readers are included as part of an innovative RFID solution designed to reduce patient anxiety and improve the workflow between clinicians, patients and administrators.

An extension of the Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, the Disney Family Cancer Center will be the first of its kind, serving the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys. Seeded by a $10 million donation from the Roy and Patricia Disney family, the facility’s approach will be to treat the body, mind and spirit of each patient. Opened in February 2010, the four-floor, 55,000-square-foot building will provide the full range of diagnostic, treatment, care and support services for cancer patients and their families.

The administration chose to deploy a comprehensive, integrated RFID solution where ThingMagic’s Astra UHF RFID readers are used to relay information from low profile passive RFID tags – located, for example, on a patient ID badge – to centralized applications that retrieve patient information in order to enhance the patient experience. This information includes patient preferences to activate custom hospital room settings - music, lighting, temperature, etc. - and location data that are sent to staff phone displays, allowing clinicians to greet or locate patients quickly.

"I walked through these doors and I swear it was like angels singing. I’m not a really spiritual person, but this is so beautiful the way it puts you at ease by diverting your mind from your treatment and using nature to help you relax,” said Julie Stevens, Disney Family Cancer Center’s first patient. “When I was treated at the hospital, I would ignore the scary room. I would close my eyes and put my mind in another place,” she said. “I don’t have to do that here. They take me to that place."

Offering high read rates, ease of installation and a track record of success in hospital settings, ThingMagic Astra readers are deployed as part of an innovative solution composed of complementary RFID products including the Reva Tag Acquisition Processor (TAP) from Reva Systems. RFID tag data acquired by the ThingMagic readers are sent to the TAP to determine "location", and then delivered upstream to a visibility application for viewing by the clinical staff. Data from these RFID subsystems are also provided to the security and environmental control systems of the hospital. This integrated solution provides a platform for expansion as the Disney Family Cancer Center explores future plans to use RFID to further enhance patient experiences and maximize the hospital’s operational efficiencies.

"The Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center is proud to play a part in this innovative use of RFID that will offer the best technological advancements to oncologists and clinicians striving to provide the best health care 24 hours a day," said Ray Lowe, Regional Director IS Operation, Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center. "When the facility opens, ThingMagic will have played an integral role in making our patients feel at home."

"Passive RFID technology has been proven to lower costs and improve efficiencies in a hospital setting, but the work done at the Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center shows it can impact something even more important – patient well-being,” said Yael Maguire, co-founder and CTO of ThingMagic. “As new health facilities open around the world, the Disney Family Cancer Center will be a model to follow for its dedication to patients through the most innovative uses of RFID technology."

ThingMagic will be attending the RFID Journal LIVE! Conference April 14-16 in Orlando, Florida. If you are interested in meeting with ThingMagic at RFID Journal LIVE!, please email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

About Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center, founded in 1943, is a comprehensive not-for-profit health care organization, sponsored by the Sisters of Providence. Composed of 448 licensed beds, the Burbank medical center is the largest hospital in the San Fernando Valley, with more than 650 physicians, and 2,000 employees and volunteers on staff. Providence Saint Joseph is known for its state-of-the-art technology and the high quality compassionate care provided by its physicians, nurses and ancillary staff. The Medical Center also offers services through its Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center, Heart Center, Acute Rehabilitation Services, Women’s Services and Emergency Department.

 

About Trimble

Trimble applies technology to make field and mobile workers in businesses and government significantly more productive. Solutions are focused on applications requiring position or location—including surveying, construction, agriculture, fleet and asset management, public safety and mapping. In addition to utilizing positioning technologies, such as GPS, lasers and optics, Trimble solutions may include software content specific to the needs of the user. Wireless technologies are utilized to deliver the solution to the user and to ensure a tight coupling of the field and the back office. Founded in 1978, Trimble is headquartered in Sunnyvale, Calif. For more information, visit Trimble's Web site at: http://www.trimble.com/.

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Media Contact:

Bill McLaughlin
Lois Paul & Partners for ThingMagic
617-986-5753
bill_mclaughlin@lpp.com


Achieve 100% Reads

"If a live tag was in the carton, the ThingMagic Mercury RFID readers caught it and achieved 100 percent read rates, with no misreading of any of the 13,500 RFID tags. In fact, we had some cartons with over 100 items, which we thought might result in RFID read errors due to high density and shielding of tags, but these, too, were read at 100 percent"

-- Frank Cornelius, New Balance